Associations between overall care experience ratings and utility and psychological well-being in men recently diagnosed with prostate cancer: findings from a population-based study

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Publication date: 
November, 2013
Presentation type: 
Poster presentation
Cancers: 
Related staff: 
Ms Marita Hennessy (former staff)
Dr Harry Comber (former staff)
Dr Frances Drummond (former staff)
Prof Linda Sharp (former staff)
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVES: Patient experience is increasingly recognised as an important measure of quality of care. A few studies have suggested that patients who report higher levels of satisfaction with care also have higher quality-of-life and higher psychological wellbeing, and are more likely to cooperate with treatment. In Ireland, this area is under-researched. The PiCTure 2 study aimed to assess the care experiences of men recently diagnosed with prostate cancer – the most common cancer among men in Ireland - and investigate associations between experiences and health-related quality-of-life (utility) and psychological wellbeing (depression, anxiety and distress). METHODS: Men diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer (ICD10 C61) 5-20 months prior to study commencement were identified through the National Cancer Registry. The patient experience questionnaire was based on the Prostate Care Questionnaire (Baker et al. 2007), modified for Ireland. Utility and psychological wellbeing were assessed using the EQ5D-5L and Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). The questionnaire was administered by post to 2,180 men during January-April 2013. EQ5D-5L responses were converted to EQ5D-3L health states and valued with UK valuations. RESULTS: 1,499 valid questionnaires were received (response rate=70%). Men rated their overall care very highly; however, there were variations with those (i) further from diagnosis, (ii) in poorer health, (iii) younger, (iv) with third level education and (v) with private health insurance significantly more likely to report poorer care experiences. Almost half of men reported maximum utility scores; one-fifth had depression, one-fifth anxiety and one-eighth stress. Lower global experience scores were significantly associated with lower utility values and poorer psychological well-being (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: While men recently diagnosed with prostate cancer report quite high overall care experience ratings, variations were reported and associations with lower utility and psychological well-being were observed. These results provide further rationale for initiatives to improve quality of care.

Published abstract: 
No
Authors: 
Hennessy M, O’ Leary E, Comber H, Drummond FJ, Sharp L
Presenter: 
Pearce A
Conference/meeting title: 
ISPOR 16th Annual European Congress
Event date: 
2 Nov 2013 to 6 Nov 2013
Venue: 
Dublin

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